Property & Casualty Profile – July

Summer Safety Tips

In This Issue

  • Summer Safety Precautions: For Working Outdoors
  • Dehydration: Helpful Tips for Keeping You Safe On The Job
  • Golf Cart Safety Tips
  • Home Matters: Swim Safely

Did You Know?

Each year, there are approximately 13,000 golf cart-related accidents that require emergency room visits. (U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission)

Summer Precautions for Working Outdoors

If you’re an outdoor worker, it is important to take precautions against exposure to sun, heat and bug bites during the summer months.

Sun – To protect against the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays:

  • Cover up. Wear lightweight, tightly woven clothing that you can’t see through.
  • Use sunscreen. A sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 blocks 93 percent of UV rays. Be sure to follow application directions.
  • Wear a hat. It should protect your neck, ears, forehead, nose, and scalp.
  • Wear UV-absorbent shades. Sunglasses should block 99 to 100 percent of UVA and UVB radiation. Before you buy, read the product label. Click here to read more about the dangers of radiation to your eyes.

Heat – The combination of heat and humidity can be a serious health threat during the summer months. To beat the heat:

  • Drink plenty of water before you get thirsty.
  • Wear light, loose-fitting, breathable clothing such as dry-fit material.
  • Eat smaller meals before work activity.
  • Skip the caffeine and soda; drink water instead.
  • Be aware that equipment such as respirators or work suits can increase heat stress.

Ticks – If you’re working in tall grass or wooded areas, take the following precautions to protect yourself from ticks:

  • Wear light-colored clothing to see ticks more easily.
  • Wear long sleeves and long pants.
  • Tuck pant legs into socks or boots.
  • Wear high boots or closed shoes that cover your feet completely.
  • Wear a hat.
  • Use tick repellents, but not on your face.
  • Wash and dry your work clothes at high temperatures.

Examine your body for ticks after work. Remove any attached ticks promptly with tweezers. In some regions, ticks may transmit Lyme disease. If you get bit and develop a rash, see your doctor.

Dehydration: Helpful Tips for Keeping You Safe on the Job

In the simplest terms, dehydration occurs when you lose more water than you take in. Staying hydrated is important to keep all your body functions running smoothly. Whenever you are working outdoors or in warm environments, you’ll want to take extra precautions as summer heats up.

Water Loss
On average, adults lose almost 10 cups of water a day simply by sweating, breathing and going to the bathroom. Along with water, you also lose electrolytes, which are vital because they help maintain the balance of fluids in the body. When you become dehydrated, your body cannot function, possibly resulting in heat stroke or even death.

How do you know if you’re dehydrated?
You’ll begin to experience one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Excessive thirst
  • Sleepiness or tiredness
  • Dry mouth
  • Muscle weakness
  • Headache
  • Dizziness

If you start to notice these warning signs, do not ignore them! Immediately take a break and give yourself time to recover.

Preventing Dehydration
The best defense against dehydration is prevention. That sounds easy enough—consume lots of fluids and foods high in water such as fruits and vegetables—but determining how much fluid can be complicated.

Unfortunately, determining appropriate water intake isn’t an exact science, especially because so much depends on age, physical condition, activity level, location and body chemistry. The best overall approach is to make a conscious effort to stay hydrated and continue drinking even if you don’t feel thirsty. In hot weather, skip coffee or soda, and make water your beverage of choice.

Pace Yourself
During periods of heavy exertion, take frequent water breaks. Adjust your intake to match your activity level and working conditions to stay healthy and alert.

Golf Cart Safety Tips

As surprising as it may be, there are many golf cart accidents annually, which results in personal injury, property damage and even death. Since golf is intended to be a fun, relaxing and enjoyable outdoor activity, review the following safety tips for keeping you and your fellow golfers safe.

  • Drivers and passengers should remain seated while the vehicle is moving at all times.
  • Never exceed the maximum capacity for a golf cart—everyone needs his or her own seat.
  • Slow down and honk when reaching an intersection to alert other drivers and pedestrians of your presence.
  • Reduce your speed when approaching pedestrians; they always have the right-of-way.
  • Reduce your speed when turning and passing other carts.
  • Use the safety mirrors when approaching intersections.
  • Keep all body parts inside the golf cart when it is in motion.
  • When it is not in use, place the golf cart’s control lever in the neutral position and remove the key.
  • Do not shift gears while the vehicle is in motion.
  • Maintain an adequate distance between you and other drivers.
  • Your maximum speed will depend on the terrain and weather conditions. Generally, you should operate a golf cart at the same speed as a well-paced walk.

To learn more, check out this study on golf-cart related injuries.

Swim Safely

Though splashing and diving are carefree fun, owning a backyard pool comes with serious responsibilities, too. From poolside party safety tips to supervision, there are many general safety precautions you can take to make sure your friends and family enjoy your pool safely.

 Here are some general recommendations for swimming pool safety:

  • Install a fence with self-locking and self-closing gates to completely isolate your pool from your house and the areas around it.
  • Do not leave your children or guests alone in the event that they would need assistance.
  • Teach pool rules to your children and guests and post them in a highly visible location.
  • Do not stick your fingers in grates and filters.
  • Do not swim for at least 30 minutes if you hear thunder or see lightning.

Use these tips to prepare yourself in the event of an emergency:

  • Take lifeguard, first aid, and CPR courses in case anyone needs assistance while on your property. Once old enough, your children should receive this same training.
  • Enroll your children in swimming classes led by a qualified swim instructor.
  • Keep rescue equipment and a telephone to call 911 close to the pool area.
  • Place emergency numbers and CPR instructions close to the pool.

Safety First

When hosting a pool party at home, it is wise to assign several adults to the job of “lifeguard” for all swimmers. These individuals should not drink alcohol and should stay on constant alert for swimmers in distress.


Download the Full Newsletter Here: Property & Casualty Profile – July 2017